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AP Migration - Sept 2017 Community Update

AP Migration - Sept 2017 Community Update

September edition of the AP Migration Community Update, highlighting news, updates and resources from our network.

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AP Migration - July 2017 Community Update

AP Migration - July 2017 Community Update

July edition of the AP Migration Community Update, highlighting news, updates and resources from our network.

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Work in Freedom: Preventing trafficking of women and girls in South Asia and the Middle East : India Country Strategy and Implementation

Work in Freedom: Preventing trafficking of women and girls in South Asia and the Middle East : India Country Strategy and Implementation

Introduction In India for the initial phase, the focus is on the domestic work sector for both inter-state and overseas migration to prevent trafficking, and promoting safe migration for women. For the inter-state migration, the states selected for pilot interventions include Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Odisha, and West Bengal (source states) and Delhi NCR and Mumbai (destination). For the overseas migration, Andhra Pradesh and Kerala have been selected. Gradually efforts will be made to explore setting up of the Workers Centres for the Garment Sector Workers in identified states in cooperation with the governments, brands and factory owners. The focus will also be on addition/strengthening the life skills and soft skills components for the ongoing skills training initiatives (run under different government schemes) by vocation training providers, enabling safe migration and awareness about rights and entitlements, as well as promoting networking and organizing of the workers.

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Labour Migration From China to Europe: Scope and Potential

Labour Migration From China to Europe: Scope and Potential

The research presented in this report was conducted under the “EU-China Dialogue on Migration and Mobility Support Project”, funded by the EU and jointly carried out by the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM).

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Decent work for domestic workers: eight good practices from Asia

Decent work for domestic workers: eight good practices from Asia

The eight good practices demonstrate successful initiatives to combat child labour in India and Nepal; to establish strong and sustainable domestic workers organizations in the form of trade unions, cooperatives or associations in Indonesia, the Philippines and the Republic of Korea; on skills development and organizing in Hong Kong, China, and on the global online IDWF communication network.

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Migrants in Disaster Risk Reduction: Practices for Inclusion

Migrants in Disaster Risk Reduction: Practices for Inclusion

In today’s increasingly globalized and mobile societies, internal and international migrants, refugees and asylum seekers represent a significant share of the population of cities and countries. This publication presents experiences from researchers and practitioners from a variety of geographical contexts on how they have been included and have participated in disaster prevention, preparedness, response and recovery activities. It aims to highlight the importance and benefits of, as well as options for, integrating migrants into decision-making, policy-setting and implementation of disaster risk reduction initiatives. This publication builds upon the knowledge and experiences gathered through the Migrants In Countries In Crisis (MICIC) Initiative, a global state-led process for which IOM has been serving as Secretariat, and the Council of Europe’s EUR-OPA programme on “Migrants, asylum seekers and refugees in the context of major risks prevention and management”.

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2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

In September 2015, the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda was adopted, and for the first time, migration was included in mainstream global development policy. With the objective of communicating how IOM identifies migration in the 2030 Agenda to stakeholders and the wider public, and to shed light on the complex challenges and opportunities that accompany the migration-related targets, this IOM publication aims to showcase how different areas of migration are addressed in the Sustainable Development Goals.

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Extreme Heat and Migration

Extreme Heat and Migration

The impacts of climate change on global temperatures profoundly affect people’s ability to sustain their livelihoods as well as their health; both of these dimensions in turn influence the migration of people. Indeed, increasing heat related to climate change is likely to result in more disruptive events, such as frequent droughts, wildfires, episodes of extreme temperatures and heat waves. Such events are already directly and indirectly displacing large numbers of people each year and likely to lead to the migration of more people in the future. For the first time, this IOM infosheet explores the links between extreme heat and migration and provides an overview of the challenges faced, as well as possible ways to address them.

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Access to justice for migrant workers in South-East Asia

Access to justice for migrant workers in South-East Asia

This report analyses access to justice for migrant workers in South-East Asia and provides recommendations for improving complaint mechanisms for labour rights abuses. Providing migrant workers with fair access to justice in South-East Asia is a key gap remaining in protecting them from exploitation and abuse. Because of the obstacles that they face to obtaining assistance through official mechanisms, migrants are often highly dependent on informal support, even when the abuses they endure are severe in nature. As a result, the data collected on migrant worker complaints within the region has been very limited to date. This report helps to fill the knowledge gap by analysing data on complainants assisted by Migrant Worker Resource Centres from 2011 to 2015. Over 1,000 cases involving more than 7,000 women and men migrant workers were documented across five countries, establishing the largest regional dataset of migrant worker complaints compiled within South-East Asia. The analysis reveals that progress has been achieved in facilitating access to justice for migrants but that major challenges remain in providing them with fair and responsive remedies.

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Attracting skilled international migrants to China: A review and comparison of policies and practices

Attracting skilled international migrants to China: A review and comparison of policies and practices

China is actively pursuing a transformation from an export-oriented, low-skilled and labour-intensive economy towards a science, technology and innovation-based economy. Such transformation inevitably spurs rapid growth in the demand for high skilled workers. More than ever committed to globalization, the Chinese government is attaching more importance to the attraction of foreign talents who not only bring valuable resources to help boost China’s economic development but also contribute to building and strengthening the relationship between China and the rest of the world. Working towards this objective of competing for global talent, China has become ever more aware of the urgent need for the introduction of specific schemes and policies to attract skilled international migrants. The study on attracting skilled international migrants to China: A review and comparison of policies and practices was conducted under the EU–China Dialogue on Migration and Mobility Support Project, a collaboration between the International Labour Organization and the International Organization for Migration, funded by the European Union. It reviews the existing policies and practices of China concerning the attraction of foreign professionals and other skilled international migrants with a comparative analysis of talent attraction policies and their outcomes in Germany, Japan, and Singapore. Based on a comparative study, recommendations are put forward for China to improve its foreign talent policies and practices in order to be more successful in the international competition for talents.

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Policy Brief on Practices and Regulations of Recruitment to Domestic Work

Policy Brief on Practices and Regulations of Recruitment to Domestic Work

The policy brief highlights common recruitment practices and regulations observed along recruitment pathways to domestic work in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Jordan and Lebanon. The purpose of this policy brief is to respond to the rising interest in improving recruitment practices and regulations in order to reduce vulnerability to human trafficking and forced labour. In some cases, examples from other regions have been highlighted. Given the complexity of cross jurisdictional recruitment practices and regulation this brief presents common practices and regulations, pointing to where and how they can constitute better practices. The mapping and analysis are based on research and lessons learned from the ILO’s Work in Freedom Programme recruitment pilots within South Asia or from South Asia to the Middle East. There are two sections to this brief, first – describing common recruitment practices and regulations and second – giving examples of better recruitment practices and corresponding regulations.

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Policy Brief on Practices and Regulations of Recruitment to Garment Work

Policy Brief on Practices and Regulations of Recruitment to Garment Work

The policy brief maps common recruitment practices and regulations observed along recruitment pathways to garment and textile work in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Jordan and Lebanon. This policy brief responds to a growing interest among policymakers and practitioners in improving recruitment practices and regulations with an eye to reducing vulnerability to human trafficking and forced labour among girl and women migrants in the garment and textile work sector. Given the complexity of cross jurisdictional and multi-tier recruitment practices and regulations, this brief looks at common practices and regulations, pointing to where and how they can constitute better practices. The mapping and analysis are based on research and lessons learned from the ILO’s Work in Freedom Programme recruitment pilots within South Asia and/or from South Asia to the Middle East. There are two sections to this brief, first – describing common recruitment practices and regulations, and second – giving examples of better recruitment practices and corresponding regulations.

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Building Labour Migration Policy Coherence in Myanmar

Building Labour Migration Policy Coherence in Myanmar

This working paper provides an overview of international labour migration governance in Myanmar, detailing the most relevant actors and policies at Union/National level and how they presently do or do not intersect, coordinate, and cooperate together. It also discusses where and how the governance of international migration can be more strongly linked to other policy domains, exploring to what extent labour migration policy is consistent with and contributing to national development plans and how it relates to other policy areas such as poverty reduction, rural development, social protection, women’s empowerment and others. By tracing out intersections and overlaps, both actual and possible, between different policies, policy areas, and the actors responsible for formulating and implementing them, this paper seeks to lay the groundwork for promoting greater policy coherence in the governance of international labour migration.

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Statistics on Labor Migration within the Asia-Pacific Region

Statistics on Labor Migration within the Asia-Pacific Region

Red Cross Red Crescent Manila Conference on Labor Migration 2015 / Manila, Philippines / 12-13 May 2015

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ILO Migration Programme in Asia and the Pacific - Protecting women and men migrant workers and promoting effective governance of labour migration

ILO Migration Programme in Asia and the Pacific - Protecting women and men migrant workers and promoting effective governance of labour migration

As per the most recent estimates, in 2013 there are 150.3 million migrants in the world who are economically active. Over half – 83.7 million – are men, and 66.6 million, women. Asia-Pacific hosts 17.2 per cent of migrant workers (25.5 million persons) (ILO, 2016). The Arab States have the highest proportion of migrant workers to all workers (35.6 per cent) and hosts 11.7 per cent of migrant workers worldwide, most of them from Asia. Labour migration largely occurs under temporary migration regimes and for less skilled work. Migrants often fill jobs unattractive to nationals and some occupations are highly gendered. Asia is also an important source region for skilled workers (in particular China, India and the Philippines). In 2013, 3 out 10 new immigrants to the OECD came from Asia (OECD, 2015).

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Migrant Workers and Social Protection in ASEAN: Moving Towards a Regional Standard?

Migrant Workers and Social Protection in ASEAN: Moving Towards a Regional Standard?

The number of migrants originating from ASEAN member states is estimated at 13.5 million, 39 percent (5.3 million) of whom are working in other ASEAN countries. An estimated 60% of the working population in these countries work in informal sectors of the economy that are not fully covered by labor laws, let alone social protection measures. In addition, nascent social protection systems in these countries provide little coverage in case of loss of worker income, and standards are generally poorly enforced. In this context, migrant social protection in ASEAN has rarely been explored. This paper considers global standards and themes regarding migrant social protection before outlining case studies of Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand. The paper shows how migrants rarely access social protection in ASEAN and recommends regional action by ASEAN member states to holistically remedy this.

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Women’s Labour Migration from Asia  and the Pacific: Opportunities and Challenges

Women’s Labour Migration from Asia and the Pacific: Opportunities and Challenges

In an era of unprecedented human mobility, migration from and within the Asia-Pacific region has assumed gendered dimensions, with implications for migration flows, trends and patterns. Gender roles, inequalities and relations affect who migrates, why and how, and migration also has significant implications for women migrant workers (WMWs) themselves. Migration can provide opportunities to improve their lives and that of their families, help them escape from social and economic vulnerabilities, and offer avenues for greater autonomy and empowerment. Migration also, however, exposes these women to different types of vulnerabilities, discrimination and risk (Sijapati and Nair, 2014), both in their origin and destination countries, particularly where such migration carries a stigma and patriarchal norms are deep-seated. For the broader society, the consequential effects of women’s increased mobility have been significant. Sending countries have benefitted from higher inflows of remittances and changes in societal and family relations, particularly as they relate to gender roles and relations. For receiving countries, the welfare gains have been considerable, in the form of increased labour supply, opportunities for native women to enter the workforce and child- and elder-care possibilities, especially in contexts where such services are limited. While countries in the region have adopted various measures to address the concerns of women migrants nationally, bilaterally and regionally, the ability to highlight issues concerning women migrant workers in the Beijing+20 discussions and in the formulation of the post-2015 development agenda provides opportunities for greater impact on gender equality and women’s empowerment. A few key areas for consideration include: greater protection for women migrant workers; measures to maximize the potential of remittances for the workers, their families and beyond; conducive policy environments, especially in destination countries; and improvements in information, evidence and knowledge base.

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